Punctuation

This page lists of the various symbols in the Punctuation group.

Punctuation marks are symbols that indicate the structure and organization of written language, as well as intonation and pauses to be observed when reading aloud.

In written English, punctuation is vital to disambiguate the meaning of sentences. For example, "woman, without her man, is nothing" (emphasizing the importance of men) and "woman: without her, man is nothing" (emphasizing the importance of women) have greatly different meanings, as do "eats shoots and leaves" (to mean "consumes plant growths") and "eats, shoots and leaves" (to mean "eats firstly, fires a weapon secondly, and leaves the scene thirdly").

The rules of punctuation vary with language, location, register and time and are constantly evolving. Certain aspects of punctuation are stylistic and are thus the author's (or editor's) choice.

Symbols in this group:

Ampersand

An ampersand (or epershand; "&") is a logogram representing the conjunction word "and". This symbol is a ligature of the letters et, Latin for "and".

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Apostrophe

The apostrophe ( ’ although often rendered as ' ) is a punctuation mark, and sometimes a diacritic mark, in languages that use the Latin alphabet or certain other alphabets.

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Asterick

An asterisk (*; Late Latin: asteriscus, from Greek: ἀστερίσκος, asteriskos, "little star") is a typographical symbol or glyph. It is so called because it resembles a conventional image of a star.

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At sign

The at sign @ is also commonly called the at symbol, ampersat, apetail or commercial at in English—and less commonly a wide range of other terms

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Braces or Curly Brackets

Curly brackets – also properly called braces in the US – are used in specialized ways in poetry and music (to mark repeats or joined lines).

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Bullet

In typography, a bullet ( • ) is a typographical symbol or glyph used to introduce items in a list

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Caret

Caret is an inverted V-shaped grapheme. Specifically, caret commonly refers to the spacing character ^ in ASCII (at code point 5Ehex) and other character sets that may also be called a hat, control, uparrow, or less frequently chevron, xor sign, to the [power of], fang, shark (or shark-fin), pointer (in Pascal), or wedge. Officially, this character is referred to as circumflex accent in both ASCII and Unicode terminology (because of its historical use in overstrike), whereas caret refers to a similar but lowered Unicode character: U+2038 ‸ caret. Additionally, there is another lowered variant with a stroke: U+2041 ⁁ caret insertion point

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Check mark

A check mark or tick is a symbol used to indicate the concept "yes".

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Colon

The colon is a punctuation mark consisting of two equally sized dots centered on the same vertical line. In Unicode, it is encoded at U+003A : colon (HTML: :).

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Comma

The comma (,) is a punctuation mark, and it appears in several variants in various languages

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Dagger

A dagger, or obelisk, U+2020 † dagger (HTML: † †), is a typographical symbol or glyph. The term "obelisk" derives from Greek ὀβελίσκος (obeliskos), which means "little obelus"; from Ancient Greek: ὀβελός (obelos) meaning "roasting spit". It was originally represented by the ÷ symbol and was first used by the Ancient Greek scholars as critical marks in manuscripts.

A double dagger or diesis, U+2021 ‡ double dagger (HTML: ‡ ‡), is a variant with two handles.

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Degree Symbol

The degree symbol (°) is a typographical symbol that is used, among other things, to represent degrees of arc (e.g. in geographic coordinate systems), hours (in the medical field), or degrees of temperature. The symbol consists of a small raised circle, historically a zero glyph.

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Ditto mark

The ditto mark (aka Stenoien Mark) (〃) is a typographic symbol indicating that the word(s) or figure(s) above it are to be repeated.

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Ellipsis

Ellipsis (plural ellipses; from the Ancient Greek: ἔλλειψις, élleipsis, "omission" or "falling short") is a series of dots that usually indicate an intentional omission of a word, sentence or whole section from the original text being quoted, and though necessary for syntactical construction, is not necessary for comprehension.

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Exclamation mark

The exclamation mark or exclamation point is a punctuation mark usually used after an interjection or exclamation to indicate strong feelings or high volume (shouting), and often marks the end of a sentence. Example: “Watch out!” The character is encoded in Unicode as U+0021 ! exclamation mark (HTML: !).

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Full Stop or Period

A full stop (British English, Hiberno-English, Australian English, and New Zealand English) or period (American English and Canadian English) is the punctuation mark placed to indicate the end of sentences.

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Guillemet

Guillemets (pron.: /ˈɡɪləmɛt/, or /ɡiːəˈmeɪ/, French: [ɡijmɛ]), also called angle quotes or French quotation marks, are polylines, pointed as if arrows (« or »), sometimes forming a complementary set of punctuation marks used as a form of quotation mark.

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Hyphen

The hyphen (‐) is a punctuation mark used to join words and to separate syllables of a single word. The use of hyphens is called hyphenation.

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Inverted question and exclamation marks

Inverted question (¿) and exclamation marks(¡) are punctuation marks used to begin interrogative and exclamatory sentences (or clauses), respectively, in written Spanish and sometimes also in languages which have cultural ties with Spanish, such as in older standards of Galician (now it is optional and not recommended) or Catalan.

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Number Sign

Number sign is a name for the symbol #, which is used for a variety of purposes, including the designation of a number (for example, "#1" stands for "number one"). The symbol is defined in Unicode as U+0023 # number sign (HTML: # as in ASCII).

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Numero

The numero sign or numero symbol, № (also represented as Nº, No, or No.) is a typographic abbreviation of the word number indicating ordinal numeration, especially in names and titles.

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Parentheses

Parentheses (/pəˈrɛnθɨsiːz/) (singular, parenthesis (/pəˈrɛnθɨsɨs/)) (also called simply brackets, or round brackets, curved brackets, oval brackets, or, colloquially, parens) contain material that could be omitted without destroying or altering the meaning of a sentence.

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Pilcrow

The pilcrow, also called the paragraph mark, paragraph sign, paraph, alinea (Latin: a lineā, "off the line"), or blind P, is a typographical character for individual paragraphs.

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Question Mark

The question mark (?; also known as an interrogation point, interrogation mark, question point, query, or eroteme), is a punctuation mark that replaces the full stop (period) at the end of an interrogative sentence in English and many other languages.

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Section sign

The section sign (Unicode U+00A7 § section sign, HTML §, TeX \S) is a typographical character used mainly to refer to a particular section of a document, such as a legal code. It is also called "double S", "hurricane", "sectional symbol", "the legal doughnut".

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Semicolon

The semicolon (;) is a punctuation mark with several uses. The Italian printer Aldus Manutius the Elder established the practice of using the semicolon to separate words of opposed meaning and to indicate interdependent statements.

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Semiquestionmacolon

Semiquestionmacolon used in a series of rhetorical questions. Why do Americans like grammar?; Why bother?; Isn't it too bothersome?

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Slash

The slash (/) is a sign used as a punctuation mark and for various other purposes. It is often called a forward slash (a retronym used to distinguish the slash from the backslash, "\"), and many other alternative names.

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Square brackets

Square brackets – also called simply brackets (US) – are mainly used to enclose explanatory or missing material usually added by someone other than the original author, especially in quoted text

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Therefore Sign

The symbol consists of three dots placed in an upright triangle and is read therefore.

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Tilde

The tilde (/ˈtɪldə/, /ˈtɪldi/; ˜ or ~ or "Squiggly" ) is a grapheme with several uses. The name of the character comes from Portuguese and Spanish, from the Latin titulus meaning "title" or "superscription", though the term "tilde" has evolved and now has a different meaning in linguistics. Some may refer to it as a "flourish".

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"Punctuation Symbols." Symbols.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 16 Sep. 2019. <https://www.symbols.com/group/48/Punctuation>.

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