Alphabets

This page lists all the various symbols in the Alphabets category.

An alphabet is a standard set of letters (basic written symbols or graphemes) that is used to write one or more languages based on the general principle that the letters represent phonemes (basic significant sounds) of the spoken language. This is in contrast to other types of writing systems, such as syllabaries (in which each character represents a syllable) and logographies (in which each character represents a word, morpheme, or semantic unit).

Symbols in this category:

Ālap

Aleph is the first letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician 'Ālep Phoenician aleph.svg, Hebrew 'Ālef א, Aramaic Ālap Aleph.svg, Syriac ʾĀlap̄ ܐ, Arabic Alif ا, and Persian.

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Alpha

Alpha (uppercase Α, lowercase α; Greek: Άλφα Álpha) is the first letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals it has a value of 1. It was derived from the Phoenician letter aleph Aleph. Letters that arose from alpha include the Latin A and the Cyrillic letter А.

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Arabic nūn

The letter is named nūn, and is written is several ways depending in its position in the word.

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ayin

Ayin or Ayn is the sixteenth letter of the Semitic abjad, including Phoenician ʿayin Phoenician ayin.svg, Hebrew ʿayin ע, Aramaic ʿē Ayin.svg, Syriac ʿē ܥ, and Arabic ʿayn ع (where it is sixteenth in abjadi order only). ﻉ comes twenty‐first in the Persian alphabet and eighteenth in the hijaʾi order of Arabic.

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bēt

Bet, Beth, Beh, or Vet is the second letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Bēt Phoenician beth.svg, Hebrew Bēt ב, Aramaic Bēth Beth.svg, Syriac Bēṯ ܒ, and Arabic Bāʾ ب Its sound value is a Voiced bilabial stop ⟨b⟩ or a Voiced labiodental fricative ⟨v⟩. This letter's name means "house" in various Semitic languages (Arabic bayt, Akkadian bītu, bētu, Hebrew: bayiṯ, Phoenician bt etc.; ultimately all from Proto-Semitic *bayt-), and appears to derive from an Egyptian hieroglyph of a house by acrophony.

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Beta

Beta (UK /ˈbiːtə/ or US /ˈbeɪtə/; uppercase Β, lowercase β, or cursive ϐ; Ancient Greek: βῆτα bḗta or Modern Greek: βήτα víta) is the second letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals it has a value of 2. In Ancient Greek, beta represented the voiced bilabial plosive /b/. In Modern Greek, it represents the voiced labiodental fricative /v/. Letters that arose from beta include the Roman letter ⟨B⟩ and the Cyrillic letters ⟨Б⟩ and ⟨В⟩.

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Bēth

Bet, Beth, Beh, or Vet is the second letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Bēt Phoenician beth.svg, Hebrew Bēt ב, Aramaic Bēth Beth.svg, Syriac Bēṯ ܒ, and Arabic Bāʾ ب Its sound value is a Voiced bilabial stop ⟨b⟩ or a Voiced labiodental fricative ⟨v⟩. This letter's name means "house" in various Semitic languages (Arabic bayt, Akkadian bītu, bētu, Hebrew: bayiṯ, Phoenician bt etc.; ultimately all from Proto-Semitic *bayt-), and appears to derive from an Egyptian hieroglyph of a house by acrophony.

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Chi

Chi is the 22nd letter of the Greek alphabet, pronounced /ˈkaɪ/ or /ˈkiː/ in English.

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Dālath

Dalet (dāleth, also spelled Daleth or Daled) is the fourth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Dālet Phoenician daleth.svg, Hebrew 'Dālet ד, Aramaic Dālath Daleth.svg, Syriac Dālaṯ ܕ, and Arabic Dāl د (in abjadi order; 8th in modern order). Its sound value is a voiced alveolar plosive ([d]).

The letter is based on a glyph of the Middle Bronze Age alphabets, probably called dalt "door" (door in Modern Hebrew is delet), ultimately based on a hieroglyph depicting a door,

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dālet

Dalet (dāleth, also spelled Daleth or Daled) is the fourth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Dālet Phoenician daleth.svg, Hebrew 'Dālet ד, Aramaic Dālath Daleth.svg, Syriac Dālaṯ ܕ, and Arabic Dāl د (in abjadi order; 8th in modern order). Its sound value is a voiced alveolar plosive ([d]).

The letter is based on a glyph of the Middle Bronze Age alphabets, probably called dalt "door" (door in Modern Hebrew is delet), ultimately based on a hieroglyph depicting a door,

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Delta

Delta is the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals it has a value of 4. It was derived from the Phoenician letter dalet Phoenician daleth.png. Letters that come from delta include Latin D and Cyrillic Д.

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Epsilon

Epsilon (uppercase Ε, lowercase ε or lunate ϵ; Greek: Έψιλον) is the fifth letter of the Greek alphabet, corresponding phonetically to a mid front unrounded vowel /e/. In the system of Greek numerals it has the value five. It was derived from the Phoenician letter He He. Letters that arose from epsilon include the Roman E, Ë and Ɛ, and Cyrillic Е, È, Ё, Є and Э.

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Eta

Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet. Originally denoting a consonant /h/, its sound value in the classical Attic dialect of Ancient Greek was a long vowel [ɛː], raised to [i] in hellenistic Greek, a process known as iotacism.

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Gāmal

Gimel is the third letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Gīml Phoenician gimel.svg, Hebrew ˈGimel ג, Aramaic Gāmal Gimel.svg, Syriac Gāmal ܓ, and Arabic ǧīm ج (in alphabetical order; fifth in spelling order). Its sound value in the original Phoenician and in all derived alphabets, save Arabic, is a voiced velar plosive [ɡ]; in Modern Standard Arabic, it represents either a /d͡ʒ/ or /ʒ/ for most Arabic speakers except in Lower Egypt, the southern parts of Yemen and some parts of Oman where it is pronounced as a voiced velar plosive [ɡ], see below and also Persian Gaf گ.Gimel is the third letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Gīml Phoenician gimel.svg, Hebrew ˈGimel ג, Aramaic Gāmal Gimel.svg, Syriac Gāmal ܓ, and Arabic ǧīm ج (in alphabetical order; fifth in spelling order). Its sound value in the original Phoenician and in all derived alphabets, save Arabic, is a voiced velar plosive [ɡ]; in Modern Standard Arabic, it represents either a /d͡ʒ/ or /ʒ/ for most A

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gīml

Gimel is the third letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Gīml Phoenician gimel.svg, Hebrew ˈGimel ג, Aramaic Gāmal Gimel.svg, Syriac Gāmal ܓ, and Arabic ǧīm ج (in alphabetical order; fifth in spelling order). Its sound value in the original Phoenician and in all derived alphabets, save Arabic, is a voiced velar plosive [ɡ]; in Modern Standard Arabic, it represents either a /d͡ʒ/ or /ʒ/ for most Arabic speakers except in Lower Egypt, the southern parts of Yemen and some parts of Oman where it is pronounced as a voiced velar plosive [ɡ], see below and also Persian Gaf گ.

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He is the fifth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Hē Phoenician he.svg, Hebrew Hē ה, Aramaic Hē He0.svg, Syriac Hē ܗ, and Arabic Hāʾ ﻫ. Its sound value is a voiced glottal fricative ([ɦ]).

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He is the fifth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Hē Phoenician he.svg, Hebrew Hē ה, Aramaic Hē He0.svg, Syriac Hē ܗ, and Arabic Hāʾ ﻫ. Its sound value is a voiced glottal fricative ([ɦ]).

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ḥēt

Ḥet or H̱et (also spelled Khet, Kheth, Chet, Cheth, Het, or Heth) is the eighth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Ḥēt Phoenician heth.png, Hebrew Ḥēt ח, Aramaic Ḥēth Heth.svg, Syriac Ḥēṯ ܚ, and Arabic Ḥā' ح.

Heth originally represented a voiceless fricative, either pharyngeal /ħ/, or velar /x/ (the two Proto-Semitic phonemes having merged in Canaanite[citation needed]). In Arabic, two corresponding letters were created for both phonemic sounds: unmodified ḥāʾ ح represents /ħ/, while ḫāʾ خ represents /x/.

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Ḥēth

Ḥet or H̱et (also spelled Khet, Kheth, Chet, Cheth, Het, or Heth) is the eighth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Ḥēt Phoenician heth.png, Hebrew Ḥēt ח, Aramaic Ḥēth Heth.svg, Syriac Ḥēṯ ܚ, and Arabic Ḥā' ح.

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Iota

Iota /aɪˈoʊtə/ (uppercase Ι, lowercase ι; Greek: Ιώτα) is the ninth letter of the Greek alphabet. It was derived from the Phoenician letter Yodh. Letters that arose from this letter include the Latin I and J and the Cyrillic І (І, і), Yi (Ї, ї), Je (Ј, ј), and iotated letters (e.g. Yu (Ю, ю)).

In the system of Greek numerals iota has a value of 10.

Iota represents the sound [i]. In ancient Greek it occurred in both long [iː] and short [i] versions, but this distinction was lost in Koine Greek.

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Jēran

Jera (also Jeran, Jeraz) is the conventional name of the j-rune ᛃ of the Elder Futhark, from a reconstructed Common Germanic stem *jēra- meaning "harvest, (good) year".

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kāp

Kaf (also spelled kaph) is the eleventh letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Kāp Phoenician kaph.svg, Hebrew Kāf כ, Aramaic Kāp Kaph.svg, Syriac Kāp̄ ܟܟ, and Arabic Kāf ک/ك (in Abjadi order).

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Kāp

Kaf (also spelled kaph) is the eleventh letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Kāp Phoenician kaph.svg, Hebrew Kāf כ, Aramaic Kāp Kaph.svg, Syriac Kāp̄ ܟܟ, and Arabic Kāf ک/ك (in Abjadi order).

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Kappa

Kappa is the 10th letter of the Greek alphabet, used to represent the /k/ sound in Ancient and Modern Greek. In the system of Greek numerals, Kʹ has a value of 20. It was derived from the Phoenician letter kaph Phoenician kaph.svg. Letters that arose from kappa include the Roman K and Cyrillic К.

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Lāmadh

Lamed or Lamedh is the twelfth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Lāmed Phoenician lamedh.svg, Hebrew 'Lāmed ל, Aramaic Lāmadh Lamed.svg, Syriac Lāmaḏ ܠ, and Arabic Lām ل. Its sound value is

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Lambda

Lambda is the 11th letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals lambda has a value of 30. Lambda is related to the Phoenician letter Lamed Lamedh. Letters in other alphabets that stemmed from lambda include the Latin L and the Cyrillic letter El (Л, л). The ancient grammarians and dramatists give evidence to the pronunciation as [laːbdaː] (λάβδα) in Classical Greek times. In Modern Greek the name of the letter, Λάμδα, is pronounced [lamða]; the spoken letter itself has the sound of "l" as with Latinate "L".

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lāmed

Lamed or Lamedh is the twelfth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Lāmed Phoenician lamedh.svg, Hebrew 'Lāmed ל, Aramaic Lāmadh Lamed.svg, Syriac Lāmaḏ ܠ, and Arabic Lām ل. Its sound value is [l].

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mēm

Mem (also spelled Meem or Mim) is the thirteenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Mēm Phoenician mem.svg, Hebrew Mēm מ, Aramaic Mem Mem.svg, Syriac Mīm ܡܡ, and Arabic Mīm م. Its value is [m].

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Mem

Mem (also spelled Meem or Mim) is the thirteenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Mēm Phoenician mem.svg, Hebrew Mēm מ, Aramaic Mem Mem.svg, Syriac Mīm ܡܡ, and Arabic Mīm م. Its value is [m].

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Mu

Mu is the 12th letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals it has a value of 40.

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Nu

Nu /njuː/ is the 13th letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals it has a value of 50. It is derived from the ancient Greek alphabet nun Phoenician nun.svg. Its Latin equivalent is N, though the lowercase resembles the Roman lowercase v ( ν {\displaystyle \nu } \nu ).

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nūn

Nun is the fourteenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Nūn Phoenician nun.svg, Hebrew Nun נ, Aramaic Nun Nun.svg, Syriac Nūn ܢܢ, and Arabic Nūn ن (in abjadi order). It is the third letter in Thaana (ނ), pronounced as "noonu".

Its sound value is [n].

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Nun

Nun is the fourteenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Nūn Phoenician nun.svg, Hebrew Nun נ, Aramaic Nun Nun.svg, Syriac Nūn ܢܢ, and Arabic Nūn ن (in abjadi order). It is the third letter in Thaana (ނ), pronounced as "noonu".

Its sound value is [n].

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Omega

Omega is the 24th and last letter of the Greek alphabet. In the Greek numeric system, it has a value of 800. The word literally means "great O" (ō mega, mega meaning 'great'), as opposed to omicron, which means "little O" (o mikron, micron meaning "little").

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Omicron

Omicron is the 15th letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals it has a value of 70. This letter is derived from the Phoenician letter ayin Phoenician ayin.svg. In classical Greek, omicron represented the sound [o] in contrast to omega [ɔː] and ου [oː]. In modern Greek, omicron represents the mid back rounded vowel /o/. Letters that arose from omicron include Roman O and Cyrillic O.

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Pe is the seventeenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Pē Phoenician pe.svg, Hebrew Pē פ, Aramaic Pē Pe0.svg, Syriac Pē ܦ, and Arabic Fāʼ ف (in abjadi order) and also Persian Peʼ پ.

The original sound value is a voiceless bilabial plosive: /p/; it retains this value in most Semitic languages except for Arabic, which having lost /p/ now uses it to render a voiceless labiodental fricative /f/.

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Pe is the seventeenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Pē Phoenician pe.svg, Hebrew Pē פ, Aramaic Pē Pe0.svg, Syriac Pē ܦ, and Arabic Fāʼ ف (in abjadi order) and also Persian Peʼ پ.

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Phi

Phi is the 21st letter of the Greek alphabet. In Ancient Greek, it represented an aspirated voiceless bilabial plosive ([pʰ]), which was the origin of its usual romanization as "ph". In modern Greek, it represents a voiceless labiodental fricative ([f]) and is correspondingly romanized as "f". Its origin is uncertain but it may be that phi originated as the letter qoppa and initially represented the sound /kʷʰ/ before shifting to Classical Greek [pʰ]. In traditional Greek numerals, phi has a value of 500 (φʹ) or 500 000 (͵φ). The Cyrillic letter Ef (Ф, ф) descends from phi.

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Pi

Pi is the sixteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, representing [p]. In the system of Greek numerals it has a value of 80. It was derived from the Phoenician letter pe Phoenician pe.svg. Letters that arose from pi include Cyrillic Pe (П, п), Coptic pi (Ⲡ, ⲡ), and Gothic pairthra (

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Psi

Psi is the 23rd letter of the Greek alphabet and has a numeric value of 700. In both Classical and Modern Greek, the letter indicates the combination /ps/ (as in English word "lapse").

For Greek loanwords in Latin and modern languages with Latin alphabets, psi is usually transliterated as "ps". In English, the letter is pronounced /ˈsaɪ/ or sometimes /ˈpsaɪ/. (In Greek, it is pronounced [ˈpsiː].)

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qōp

Qoph or Qop (Phoenician Qōp Phoenician qoph.svg) is the nineteenth letter of the Semitic abjads. Aramaic Qop Qoph.svg is derived from the Phoenician letter, and derivations from Aramaic include Hebrew Qof ק, Syriac Qōp̄ ܩ and Arabic Qāf ق.

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Qop

Qoph or Qop (Phoenician Qōp Phoenician qoph.svg) is the nineteenth letter of the Semitic abjads. Aramaic Qop Qoph.svg is derived from the Phoenician letter, and derivations from Aramaic include Hebrew Qof ק, Syriac Qōp̄ ܩ and Arabic Qāf ق.

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rēš

Resh is the twentieth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Rēsh Phoenician res.svg, Hebrew Rēsh ר, Aramaic Rēsh Resh.svg, Syriac Rēsh ܪ, and Arabic Rāʾ ر. Its sound value is one of a number of rhotic consonants: usually [r] or [ɾ], but also [ʁ] or [ʀ] in Hebrew.

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Rēsh

Resh is the twentieth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Rēsh Phoenician res.svg, Hebrew Rēsh ר, Aramaic Rēsh Resh.svg, Syriac Rēsh ܪ, and Arabic Rāʾ ر. Its sound value is one of a number of rhotic consonants: usually [r] or [ɾ], but also [ʁ] or [ʀ] in Hebrew.

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Rho

Rho is the 17th letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals, it has a value of 100. It is derived from Phoenician letter res Phoenician res.svg. Its uppercase form is not to be confused with the Latin letter P, although both types use the same glyph: P.

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Sa (kana)

さ, in hiragana, or サ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which each represent one mora. Both represent [sa]. The shapes of these kana originate from 左 and 散, respectively.

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ṣādē

Ṣade (also spelled Ṣādē, Tsade, Ṣaddi, Ṣad, Tzadi, Sadhe, Tzaddik) is the eighteenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Çādē Phoenician sade.svg, Hebrew Ṣādi צ, Aramaic Ṣāḏē Sade 1.svg, Syriac Ṣāḏē ܨ, and Arabic Ṣād ص. Its oldest sound value is probably /sˤ/, although there is a variety of pronunciation in different modern Semitic languages and their dialects. It represents the coalescence of three Proto-Semitic "emphatic consonants" in Canaanite. Arabic, which kept the phonemes separate, introduced variants of ṣād and ṭāʾ to express the three (see ḍād, ẓāʾ). In Aramaic, these emphatic consonants coalesced instead with ʿayin and ṭēt, respectively, thus Hebrew ereṣ ארץ (earth) is araʿ ארע in Aramaic.

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Ṣādhē

Ṣade (also spelled Ṣādē, Tsade, Ṣaddi, Ṣad, Tzadi, Sadhe, Tzaddik) is the eighteenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Çādē Phoenician sade.svg, Hebrew Ṣādi צ, Aramaic Ṣāḏē Sade 1.svg, Syriac Ṣāḏē ܨ, and Arabic Ṣād ص. Its oldest sound value is probably /sˤ/, although there is a variety of pronunciation in different modern Semitic languages and their dialects. It represents the coalescence of three Proto-Semitic "emphatic consonants" in Canaanite. Arabic, which kept the phonemes separate, introduced variants of ṣād and ṭāʾ to express the three (see ḍād, ẓāʾ). In Aramaic, these emphatic consonants coalesced instead with ʿayin and ṭēt, respectively, thus Hebrew ereṣ ארץ (earth) is araʿ ארע in Aramaic.

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sāmek

Samekh or Simketh is the fifteenth letter of many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Ṣāmek Phoenician samekh.svg, Hebrew ˈSamekh ס, Aramaic Semkath Samekh.svg, Syriac Semkaṯ ܣ, representing /s/. The Arabic alphabet, however, uses a letter based on Phoenician Šīn to represent /s/ (see there); however, that glyph takes Samekh's place in the traditional Abjadi order of the Arabic alphabet.

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Semkath

Samekh or Simketh is the fifteenth letter of many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Ṣāmek Phoenician samekh.svg, Hebrew ˈSamekh ס, Aramaic Semkath Samekh.svg, Syriac Semkaṯ ܣ, representing /s/. The Arabic alphabet, however, uses a letter based on Phoenician Šīn to represent /s/ (see there); however, that glyph takes Samekh's place in the traditional Abjadi order of the Arabic alphabet.

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Shin

Shin (also spelled Šin (šīn) or Sheen) literally means "teeth", "press", and "sharp"; It is the twenty-first letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Shin Phoenician sin.svg, Hebrew Shin ש, Aramaic Shin Shin.svg, Syriac Shin ܫ, and Arabic Shin ش‎ (in abjadi order, 13th in modern order). Its sound value is a voiceless sibilant, [ʃ] or [s].

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Sigma

Sigma is the eighteenth letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals, it has a value of 200. When used at the end of a word (when the word is not all caps), the final form (ς) is used, e.g. Ὀδυσσεύς (Odysseus); note the two sigmas in the center of the name, and the word-final sigma at the end.

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šīn

Shin (also spelled Šin (šīn) or Sheen) literally means "teeth", "press", and "sharp"; It is the twenty-first letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Shin Phoenician sin.svg, Hebrew Shin ש, Aramaic Shin Shin.svg, Syriac Shin ܫ, and Arabic Shin ش‎ (in abjadi order, 13th in modern order). Its sound value is a voiceless sibilant, [ʃ] or [s].

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Tau

Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals it has a value of 300.

The name in English is pronounced /taʊ/ or /tɔː/,

but in modern Greek it is [taf]. This is because the pronunciation of the combination of Greek letters αυ has changed from ancient to modern times from one of [au] to either [av] or [af], depending on what follows (see Greek orthography).

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tāw

Taw, tav, or taf is the twenty-second and last letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Tāw Phoenician taw.svg, Hebrew Tav ת, Aramaic Taw Taw.svg, Syriac Taw ܬ, and Arabic Tāʼ ت (in abjadi order, 3rd in modern order). Its original sound value is /t/.

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Taw

Taw, tav, or taf is the twenty-second and last letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Tāw Phoenician taw.svg, Hebrew Tav ת, Aramaic Taw Taw.svg, Syriac Taw ܬ, and Arabic Tāʼ ت (in abjadi order, 3rd in modern order). Its original sound value is /t/.

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ṭēt

Teth, also written as Ṭēth or Tet, is the ninth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Ṭēt Phoenician teth.svg, Hebrew Ṭēt ט, Aramaic Ṭēth Teth.svg, Syriac Ṭēṯ ܛ, and Arabic Ṭāʾ ط. It is 16th in modern Arabic order. The Persian Ța is pronounced as a hard "t" sound and is the 19th letter in the modern Persian alphabet. The Phoenician letter also gave rise to the Greek theta (Θ), originally an aspirated voiceless alveolar stop but now used for the voiceless dental fricative.

The sound value of Teth is /tˤ/, one of the Semitic emphatic consonants.

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Ṭēth

Teth, also written as Ṭēth or Tet, is the ninth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Ṭēt Phoenician teth.svg, Hebrew Ṭēt ט, Aramaic Ṭēth Teth.svg, Syriac Ṭēṯ ܛ, and Arabic Ṭāʾ ط. It is 16th in modern Arabic order. The Persian Ța is pronounced as a hard "t" sound and is the 19th letter in the modern Persian alphabet. The Phoenician letter also gave rise to the Greek theta (Θ), originally an aspirated voiceless alveolar stop but now used for the voiceless dental fricative.

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The Phoenix Symbol

In Greek mythology, a phoenix or phenix (Ancient Greek φοίνιξ phóinīx) is a long-lived bird that is cyclically regenerated or reborn. Associated with the sun, a phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity.

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The Ł Letter

Ł or ł, described in English as L with stroke, is a letter of the Polish, Kashubian, Sorbian, Łacinka (Latin Belarusian), Łatynka (Latin Ukrainian), Wymysorys, Navajo, Dene Suline, Inupiaq, Zuni, Hupa, and Dogrib alphabets, several proposed alphabets for the Venetian language, and the ISO 11940 romanization of the Thai alphabet. In Slavic languages, it represents the continuation of Proto-Slavic non-palatal l (see dark L), except Polish where it evolved into /w/. In most non-European languages, it represents a voiceless alveolar lateral fricative or similar sound.

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Upsilon

Upsilon is the 20th letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals, Υʹ has a value of 400. It is derived from the Phoenician waw Phoenician waw.svg.

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wāw

Waw (wāw "hook") is the sixth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician wāw Phoenician waw.svg, Aramaic waw Waw.svg, Hebrew vav (also vau) ו, Syriac waw ܘ and Arabic wāw و (sixth in abjadi order; 27th in modern Arabic order).

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Waw

Waw (wāw "hook") is the sixth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician wāw Phoenician waw.svg, Aramaic waw Waw.svg, Hebrew vav (also vau) ו, Syriac waw ܘ and Arabic wāw و (sixth in abjadi order; 27th in modern Arabic order).

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Xi

Xi is the 14th letter of the Greek alphabet. It is pronounced [ksi] in Modern Greek, and generally /ˈzaɪ/ or /ˈsaɪ/ in English. In the system of Greek numerals, it has a value of 60. Xi was derived from the Phoenician letter samekh Phoenician samekh.svg.

Xi is not to be confused with the letter chi, which gave its form to the Latin letter X.

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yōd

Yodh (also spelled Yud, Yod, Jod, or Jodh) is the tenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Yōd Phoenician yodh.svg, Hebrew Yōd י, Aramaic Yodh Yod.svg, Syriac Yōḏ ܚ, and Arabic Yāʾ ي (in abjadi order, 28th in modern order). Its sound value is /j/ in all languages for which it is used; in many languages, it also serves as a long vowel, representing /iː/.

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Yodh

Yodh (also spelled Yud, Yod, Jod, or Jodh) is the tenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Yōd Phoenician yodh.svg, Hebrew Yōd י, Aramaic Yodh Yod.svg, Syriac Yōḏ ܚ, and Arabic Yāʾ ي (in abjadi order, 28th in modern order). Its sound value is /j/ in all languages for which it is used; in many languages, it also serves as a long vowel, representing /iː/.

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Zain

Zayin (also spelled zain or zayn or simply zay) is the seventh letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Zayin Phoenician zayin.svg, Hebrew 'Zayin ז, Aramaic Zain Zayin.svg, Syriac Zayn ܙ, and Arabic Zayn ز. It represents the sound [z].

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zayin

Zayin (also spelled zain or zayn or simply zay) is the seventh letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Zayin Phoenician zayin.svg, Hebrew 'Zayin ז, Aramaic Zain Zayin.svg, Syriac Zayn ܙ, and Arabic Zayn ز. It represents the sound [z].

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Zeta

Zeta is the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals, it has a value of 7. It was derived from the Phoenician letter zayin Zayin. Letters that arose from zeta include the Roman Z and Cyrillic З.

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ʾālep

Aleph is the first letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician 'Ālep Phoenician aleph.svg, Hebrew 'Ālef א, Aramaic Ālap Aleph.svg, Syriac ʾĀlap̄ ܐ, Arabic Alif ا, and Persian.

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"Alphabets Symbols." Symbols.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 11 Dec. 2017. <http://www.symbols.com/category/66>.

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