Coat of arms of Bahamas



 Lynn Atchison Beech
Coat of arms of Bahamas

The Coat of Arms of the Bahamas contains a shield with the national symbols as its focal point.

The escutcheon (shield) is supported by a marlin and flamingo. The crest on top of the helm (helmet) is a conch shell, which represents the varied marine life of the island chain. Below the helm is the escutcheon itself, whose main charge is a ship, reputed to represent the Santa María of Christopher Columbus. It is sailing beneath a sun in the chief. The animals supporting the shield are the national animals, and the national motto is found at the bottom. The flamingo is located upon land, and the marlin upon sea, indicating the geography of the islands.

The vibrant tinctures of the coat of arms are also intended to point to a bright future for the islands. They are also reputed to have been maintained for their attractiveness to tourists.

The Coat of Arms was approved by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II on 7 December 1971 for use by the Bahamian People and the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. It was designed by Bahamian artist and clergyman, Rev. Dr. Hervis L. Bain, Jr., who is also a Member of the Order of the British Empire.

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