Corporate Brands

This page lists all the various symbols in the Corporate Brands category.

Just as a nation's flag expresses the distinct identity of a country, so, too, a logotype — typically a symbol or letters — helps to establish the name and define the character of a corporation. Effective logos become synonymous with the organizations they portray. They are instantly recognized by millions of people, and help to identify their companies and convey a message about the brands for which they stand.

Symbols in this category:

Dunkin' Donuts Logo

The Dunkin' Donuts logo is two Ds side by side in orange and hot pink, placed on a coffee cup next to the words "Dunkin' Donuts" written in orange and hot pink.

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Earthen Fire Refinery

Insignia of the Earthen Fire Refinery, an organization featured in the franchise “Avatar: The Last Airbender”.

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Emirates Logo

Since its formation in 1985, though to a limited extent until all aircraft were repainted, Emirates aeroplanes carried a section of the United Arab Emirates flag on the tail fins, a calligraphy of the logo in Arabic on the engines and the "Emirates" logo on the fuselage both in Arabic and English.

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FedEx Logo

FedEx is organized into operating units, each of which has its own version of the wordmark, designed by Lindon Leader of Landor Associates, of San Francisco, in 1994.

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Firefox logo

The logo of the popular Internet browser from Mozilla.

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Gmail logo

The logo of Gmail, the Email from Google.

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Google Chrome Logo

The logo of the popular Internet browser.

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Google Logo

Google has had many logos since its renaming from BackRub. The current official Google logo was designed by Ruth Kedar, and is a wordmark based on the Catull typeface. The company also includes various modifications and/or humorous features, such as cartoon modifications of their logo for use on holidays, birthdays of famous people, and major events, such as the Olympics. These special logos, some designed by Dennis Hwang, have become known as Google Doodles.

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Gucci

Gucci is an Italian luxury brand of fashion and leather goods, part of the Gucci Group, which is owned by the French holding company Kering.

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Heinz Logo

The Heinz Corporate Logo serves to identify the global operations of H.J. Heinz Company. In the process, it has become one of the world's most familiar symbols and expresses imagery of tradition and high quality.

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IBM Logo

IBM's current "8-bar" logo was designed in 1972 by graphic designer Paul Rand. It was a general replacement for a 13-bar logo that first appeared in public on the 1966 release of the TSS/360. Logos designed in the 1970s tended to be sensitive to the technical limitations of photocopiers, which were then being widely deployed. A logo with large solid areas tended to be poorly copied by copiers in the 1970s, so companies preferred logos that avoided large solid areas. The 1972 IBM logos are an example of this tendency. With the advent of digital copiers in the mid-1980s this technical restriction had largely disappeared; at roughly the same time, the 13-bar logo was abandoned for almost the opposite reason – it was difficult to render accurately on the low-resolution digital printers (240 dots per inch) of the time. The company wrote the IBM initials using individual atoms in 1990, as a demonstration of using a scanning tunneling microscope to move atoms. This was the first structure ass

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"Corporate Brands Symbols." Symbols.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. Web. 25 Jan. 2020. <https://www.symbols.com/category/54/Corporate+Brands>.

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