What's the meaning of the Seal of Tennessee »

Seal of Tennessee

This page is about the meaning, origin and characteristic of the symbol, emblem, seal, sign, logo or flag: Seal of Tennessee.

Image of the Seal of Tennessee

An official Great Seal of Tennessee is provided for in the Constitution of the State of Tennessee of February 6, 1796. However, design was not undertaken until 25 September 1801.

The Roman numerals XVI, representing Tennessee as the 16th state to enter the United States, is found at the top of the seal.

The images of a plow, a bundle of wheat, a cotton plant, and the word "Agriculture" below the three images occupying the center of the seal. Wheat and cotton were and still are important cash crops grown in the state.

The lower half of the seal was originally supposed to display a boat and a boatman with the word "Commerce" underneath, but was changed to a flat-bottomed-riverboat without a boatman subsequently. River trade was important to the state due to three large rivers: the Tennessee River, the Cumberland River, and the Mississippi River; the boat continues to represent the importance of commerce to the State.

Surrounding the images are the words "The Great Seal of the State of Tennessee", and "Feb. 6th, 1796". The day and month have been dropped from later designs.

Graphical characteristics:
Asymmetric, Closed shape, Colorful, Contains both straight and curved lines, Has no crossing lines.

Category: Emblems.

Seal of Tennessee is part of the U.S. State Seals group.

More symbols in U.S. State Seals:

More symbols in Emblems:

An emblem is an abstract or representational pictorial image that represents a concept, like a moral truth, or an allegory, or a person, like a king or saint. Although words emblem and symbol are of… read more »

Have a discussion about Seal of Tennessee with the community:

Citation

Use the citation below to add this symbol to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"Seal of Tennessee." Symbols.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 17 Oct. 2017. <http://www.symbols.com/symbol/seal-of-tennessee>.

We need you!

Are we missing an important symbol in this category?