Astronomical Symbols

This page lists all the various symbols in the Astronomical Symbols category.

Astronomical symbols are symbols used to represent various celestial objects, theoretical constructs and observational events in astronomy. The earliest forms of these symbols appear in Greek papyri of late antiquity. The Byzantine codices in which the Greek papyri were preserved continued and extended the inventory of astronomical symbols. New symbols were further invented to represent many just-discovered planets and minor planets discovered in the 18th-20th centuries.

Symbols in this category:

10 Hygiea

10 Hygiea is the fourth largest asteroid in the Solar System by volume and mass and is located in the asteroid belt.

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10 Hygiea

10 Hygiea is the fourth largest asteroid in the Solar System by volume and mass and is located in the asteroid belt.

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11 Parthenope

11 Parthenope is a large, bright main-belt asteroid.

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11 Parthenope

11 Parthenope is a large, bright main-belt asteroid.

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12 Victoria

12 Victoria is a large main-belt asteroid.

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13 Egeria

13 Egeria is a large main-belt G-type asteroid

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14 Irene

14 Irene is a large main-belt asteroid, discovered by John Russell Hind on May 19, 1851.

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15 Eunomia

15 Eunomia is a very large asteroid in the inner asteroid belt

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16 Psyche

16 Psyche is one of the ten most massive main-belt asteroids. It is over 200 kilometers in diameter and contains a little less than 1% of the mass of the entire asteroid belt. It is the most massive metallic M-type asteroid.

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18 Melpomene

18 Melpomene is a large, bright main-belt asteroid that was discovered by J. R. Hind on June 24, 1852, and named after Melpomenē, the Muse of tragedy in Greek mythology. It is classified as an S-type asteroid and is composed of silicates and metals.

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19 Fortuna

19 Fortuna is one of the largest main-belt asteroids. It has a composition similar to 1 Ceres: a darkly colored surface that is heavily space-weathered with the composition of primitive organic compounds, including tholins.

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2 Pallas

Pallas, minor-planet designation 2 Pallas, is the second asteroid to have been discovered (after Ceres), and one of the largest in the Solar System

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26 Proserpina

26 Proserpina is a main-belt asteroid discovered by R. Luther on May 5, 1853. It is named after the Roman goddess Proserpina, the daughter of Ceres and the Queen of the Underworld.

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28 Bellona

28 Bellona is a large main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by R. Luther on March 1, 1854, and named after Bellōna, the Roman goddess of war; the name was chosen to mark the beginning of the Crimean War.

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29 Amphitrite

29 Amphitrite is one of the largest S-type asteroids, probably third in diameter after Eunomia and Juno, although Iris and Herculina are similar in size.

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3 Juno

Juno, minor-planet designation 3 Juno in the Minor Planet Center catalogue system, was the third asteroid to be discovered and is one of the larger main-belt asteroids, being one of the two largest stony (S-type) asteroids, along with 15 Eunomia.

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3 Juno

Juno, minor-planet designation 3 Juno in the Minor Planet Center catalogue system, was the third asteroid to be discovered and is one of the larger main-belt asteroids, being one of the two largest stony (S-type) asteroids, along with 15 Eunomia.

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37 Fides

37 Fides (pron.: /ˈfaɪdiːz/ FY-deez) is a large main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by German astronomer Karl Theodor Robert Luther on October 5, 1855, and named after Fides, the Roman goddess of loyalty. Fides was the last of the main-belt asteroids to be assigned an iconic symbol.

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4 Vesta

Vesta, minor-planet designation 4 Vesta, is one of the largest asteroids in the Solar System, with a mean diameter of 525 kilometers (326 mi).

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4 Vesta

Vesta, minor-planet designation 4 Vesta, is one of the largest asteroids in the Solar System, with a mean diameter of 525 kilometers (326 mi).

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4 Vesta

Vesta, minor-planet designation 4 Vesta, is one of the largest asteroids in the Solar System, with a mean diameter of 525 kilometers (326 mi).

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5 Astraea

5 Astraea is a large main-belt asteroid. Its surface is highly reflective (bright) and its composition is probably a mixture of nickel-iron with magnesium- and iron-silicates.

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5 Astraea

5 Astraea is a large main-belt asteroid. Its surface is highly reflective (bright) and its composition is probably a mixture of nickel-iron with magnesium- and iron-silicates.

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6 Hebe

6 Hebe (pron.: /ˈhiːbiː/ HEE-bee) is a large main-belt asteroid, containing around half a percent of the mass of the belt.

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6 Hebe

6 Hebe (pron.: /ˈhiːbiː/ HEE-bee) is a large main-belt asteroid, containing around half a percent of the mass of the belt.

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7 Iris

7 Iris is a large main-belt asteroid. Among the S-type asteroids, it ranks fifth in geometric mean diameter after Eunomia, Juno, Amphitrite and Herculina.

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8 Flora

8 Flora is a large, bright main-belt asteroid.

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9 Metis

9 Metis is one of the larger main-belt asteroids.

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Aries

Aries /ˈɛəriːz/ (meaning "ram") is the first astrological sign in the Zodiac, spanning the first 30 degrees of celestial longitude (0°≤ λ <30º), which area the Sun transits, on average, between March 21 to April 20 each year.

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Ceres

Ceres, minor-planet designation 1 Ceres, is the only dwarf planet in the inner Solar System, and the largest asteroid. It is a rock–ice body 950 km (590 mi) in diameter, and the smallest identified dwarf planet. It contains about one third of the mass of the asteroid belt. Discovered on 1 January 1801 by Giuseppe Piazzi, it was the first asteroid to be identified, though it was classified as a planet at the time. It is named after Ceres, the Roman goddess of growing plants, the harvest, and motherly love.

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Comet

A comet is an icy small Solar System body (SSSB) that, when close enough to the Sun, displays a visible coma (a thin, fuzzy, temporary atmosphere) and sometimes also a tail.

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Conjunction (astology)

0° angle/two or more planets in the same sign

A circle with a line implying two objects are in the same place (also, the starting point of an angle)

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Earth

Earth is the third planet from the Sun, and the densest and fifth-largest of the eight planets in the Solar System. It is also the largest of the Solar System's four terrestrial planets. It is sometimes referred to as the world or the Blue Planet.

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First Quarter Moon

Denotes a first quarter moon or a soli-lunar arc in the range 90°-135°.

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Full Moon

Denotes a full moon or a soli-lunar arc in the range 180°-225°.

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Golden number 10

On a clog almanac, this symbol represents an aspect of the lunar cycle.

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Golden number 15

On a clog almanac, this symbol represents an aspect of the lunar cycle.

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Golden number 17

On a clog almanac, this symbol represents an aspect of the lunar cycle.

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Golden number 17 (alternate)

On a clog almanac, this symbol represents an aspect of the lunar cycle.

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Ishtar star

Simplified version of the ancient Mesopotamian eight-pointed star symbol of the goddess Ishtar (Inana/Inanna), representing the planet Venus as morning or evening star.

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Jupiter

Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and the largest planet in the Solar System. It is a gas giant with mass one-thousandth that of the Sun but is two and a half times the mass of all the other planets in the Solar System combined.

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Mars

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second smallest planet in the Solar System. Named after the Roman god of war, it is often described as the "Red Planet", as the iron oxide prevalent on its surface gives it a reddish appearance.

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Mercury

Mercury is the smallest and closest to the Sun of the eight planets in the Solar System, with an orbital period of about 88 Earth days. Seen from the Earth, it appears to move around its orbit in about 116 days, which is much faster than any other planet.

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Moon

The Moon is the only natural satellite of the Earth, and the fifth largest satellite in the Solar System. It is the largest natural satellite of a planet in the Solar System relative to the size of its primary, having 27% the diameter and 60% the density of Earth, resulting in 1⁄81 its mass. The Moon is the second densest satellite after Io, a satellite of Jupiter.

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Neptune

Neptune is the eighth and farthest planet from the Sun in the Solar System. It is the fourth-largest planet by diameter and the third-largest by mass. Among the gaseous planets in the solar system, Neptune is the most dense.

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New Moon

Denotes the new moon or a soli-lunar arc in the range 0°-45°.

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Opposition (planets)

180° angle/Six signs apart

The glyph of the Conjunction plus a circle on top of its line, implying two objects are in front (opposed) of each other.

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Pentacle

A pentacle (or pantacle in Thelema) is an amulet used in magical evocation, generally made of parchment, paper or metal (although it can be of other materials), on which the symbol of a spirit or energy being evoked is drawn. It is often worn around the neck, or placed within the triangle of evocation. Protective symbols may also be included (sometimes on the reverse), a common one being the five-point form of the Seal of Solomon, called a pentacle of Solomon or pentangle of Solomon. Many varieties of pentacle can be found in the grimoires of Solomonic magic; they are also used in some neopagan magical traditions, such as Wicca, alongside other magical tools.

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Pluto

Pluto, formal designation 134340 Pluto, is the second-most-massive known dwarf planet in the Solar System (after Eris) and the tenth-most-massive body observed directly orbiting the Sun.

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Quadrature (astronomy)

In astronomy, quadrature is the aspect of a heavenly body in which it makes a right angle with the direction of the Sun. It is applied especially to the apparent position of a superior planet, or of the Moon at first and last quarters.

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Saturn

Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun and the second largest planet in the Solar System, after Jupiter. Named after the Roman god of agriculture, Saturn, its astronomical symbol (♄) represents the god's sickle.

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Saturn/Lead #1

A symbol representing both the planet Saturn and the metal lead. These two things were often associated with each other. For more details, see the symbols for 'Saturn' and 'Lead'.

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Saturn/Lead #2

A symbol representing both the planet Saturn and the metal lead. These two things were often associated with each other. For more details, see the symbols for 'Saturn' and 'Lead'.

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Star

A star is a massive, luminous sphere of plasma held together by gravity

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Star of Venus

The Star of Venus also called the Star of Ishtar is an ancient symbol originating in Iraq used as early as 2000 BCE that represents the planet Venus, historically to represent the Babylonian and Assyrian Goddess Ishtar that are connected with Venus, as well as being historically used by Phoenician culture to represent Venus and the goddess Astarte (a counterpart of Ishtar)

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Sun

The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System. It is almost perfectly spherical and consists of hot plasma interwoven with magnetic fields.

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Taurus

Taurus is the second astrological sign in the Zodiac. It spans the 30-60th degree of the zodiac, between 27.25 and 54.75 degree of celestial longitude, which the Sun transits this area on average between April 21 to May 22 each year.

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Uranus

Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun. It has the third-largest planetary radius and fourth-largest planetary mass in the Solar System. Uranus is similar in composition to Neptune, and both are of different chemical composition than the larger gas giants Jupiter and Saturn.

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Venus

Venus is the second planet from the Sun, orbiting it every 224.7 Earth days.The planet is named after the Roman goddess of love and beauty.

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"Astronomical Symbols." Symbols.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 22 Dec. 2014. <http://www.symbols.com/category/34>.

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